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Rolling Review Kick-Off: Data-Loss Prevention

Rolling Review
Data Loss Prevention
Data-Loss Prevention Rolling Review Kick-Off

Vendors offer more options for protecting data throughout its travels. We'll put their claims to the test.

Reviewed so far:

DLP Rolling Review: RSA Takes Classification Up A Notch
The RSA Data Loss Prevention Suite sports a stellar user interface and an uncanny ability to sniff out sensitive data wherever it resides.

DLP Rolling Review: Safend Safeguards At The Endpoint
Safend estimates that 60% of corporate data resides on endpoints, and that's where Safend Protector Endpoint aims its DLP resources.

DLP Rolling Review: Code Green's DLP Appliance
The CI 1500 performed well in many areas and not so well in others.

DLP Rolling Review: Symantec's DLP-9
We tip our hats toSymantec for bringing to market almost everything we look for in a comprehensive data loss prevention suite via its DLP-9, formerly from Vontu.

DLP Rolling Review: TrendMicro Leakproof
Trend seems to have fully integrated Provilla's DLP technology into its core offerings.

DLP Rolling Review: Sophos Endpoint Security
Sophos has made strategic acquisitions in an attempt to round out its range of endpoint security capabilities.

DLP Rolling Review Wrap-Up
We've got interesting results and observations that will help you decide if DLP fits your risk management strategy, and if so, which vendors you should be talking to.

Not long ago, CIOs faced an uphill battle trying to convince their organizations of the need for enterprise spam protection. Today you'd be hard-pressed to find even a small organization that hasn't implemented some sort of integrated spam/virus protection strategy.

Antivirus protection is crucial, but the growing list of very public data leaks and their often-expensive aftermath show that stopping external attacks isn't the last word in protecting valuable information. The need for more safeguards has spawned a new class of protection, dubbed data-loss prevention, or DLP.

Granted, only a small percentage of businesses have to worry about safeguarding millions of records containing credit card data. But every organization holds confidential data of some sort that must be protected--whether it's a spreadsheet with payroll data or the design for a top-secret weapon being built by a defense contractor. Therefore, all organizations have significant motivation to protect key digital assets.

However, if the need for safer data is clear, the definition of DLP isn't. What constitutes DLP? Any piece of backup software, disk encryption software, firewall, network access control appliance, virus scanner, security event and incident management appliance, network behavior analysis appliance--you name it--can be loosely defined as a product that facilitates DLP.

For the purposes of this Rolling Review, we will define enterprise DLP offerings as those that take a holistic, multitiered approach to stopping data loss, including the ability to apply policies and quarantine information as it rests on a PC (data in use), as it rests on network file systems (data at rest), and as it traverses the LAN or leaves the corporate boundary via some communication protocol (data in motion).
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