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How to Fail: Digital Transformation Mistakes

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Every organization today is undergoing some form of digital transformation, and because it's a new process, there isn't a map or guide to help you move from the beginning to the end of such a massive and dynamic project. Perhaps because companies are making it up along the way, there have been some well-publicized setbacks experienced by big, respected companies in their journeys.

Yet avoiding the journey is not an option, either. Consider what happened to travel agency Thomas Cook or retail giant Sears. If you don't keep up with the changes disrupting, or even remaking your industry, you stand to lose your position or even your entire company.

If you are embarking on your digital transformation, how do you know which mistakes to avoid? Gartner analyst Mark Raskino set out to create a list of the big mistakes, culled from the experience of his colleagues in their work with CIOs and executive boards around the world. He delivered that list of Nine Corporate Digital Business Transformation Mistakes to Avoid during a session at the Gartner IT Symposium conference in Orlando, Florida in October, 2019

Organizations tend to think of digital transformation as a set of technologies. But it goes deeper than that, according to Raskino. Digital transformation must be at the core of the business.

"Anywhere and everywhere technology is becoming part of what we do," he said. "It is part of the core, part of the product, part of the value proposition."

As organizations move to changing their core, Raskino offered the following nine avoidable weaknesses that thwart organizations as they work to achieve digital transformation.

Read the rest of this article at InformationWeek.