Tandberg Introduces 8TB Removable Disk Library For SMBs

With four years of experience and solid growth in the SMB tape-replacement market, Tandberg Data is extending its RDX-based product--an entry-level tape alternative that combines the advantages of disk and tape--with the first removable disk library, providing up to 8TBytes of online storage in a multicartridge 2U form factor. Available in volume at a starting price of $3,999, the RDX QuikStation consists of eight RDX docks that can be configured as either eight individually addressable iSCSI di

January 26, 2011

4 Min Read
Network Computing logo

With four years of experience and solid growth in the SMB tape-replacement market, Tandberg Data is extending its RDX-based product--an entry-level tape alternative that combines the advantages of disk and tape--with the first removable disk library, providing up to 8TBytes of online storage in a multicartridge 2U form factor. Available in volume at a starting price of $3,999, the RDX QuikStation consists of eight RDX docks that can be configured as either eight individually addressable iSCSI disk targets or as an emulated tape autoloader or library, as well as a Linux-based server.

Compatible with backup applications like Computer Associates' ARCserve, Symantec Backup Exec and Tandberg Data's AccuGuard Server backup and deduplication software, QuikStation features Web-based management capabilities for fast, easy and secure remote system configuration, management, operation, status checks and security, says the company. Calling it the Swiss Army knife of data protection, Tandberg, the leader in RDX removable storage systems, says the RDX QuikStation is also easy on power, requiring just 90 watts, or the equivalent of a light bulb.

NETWORK COMPUTING contacted a number of analysts about the RDX QuikStation and what's happening in the tape and tape-replacement/removable disk markets, and they were all pretty bullish about the Tandberg opportunity.

Rather than call it the tape market, Mark Peters, senior analyst, Enterprise Strategy Group, says it should be known as the data protection market. This announcement, he continues, shows the continuing investment that is taking place. "It's still a multibillion-dollar market. Yes, it's been slowing or contracting over recent years, but there are signs that it has stabilized. Indeed, certain broad industry trends--automated tiering plus archiving importance, plus the drive to economic efficiency plus green--all mitigate in favor of tape or RDX tape-like products having continued stability. The introduction of more flexibility, things like QuikStation at the lower end and things like file systems for tape, such as LTFS, might actually underpin a resurgence for this category."

He says the QuikStation is significant because it both highlights and helps to address the need for structured data protection (DP) approaches at even the lower/smaller end of business. "DP is crucial for all IT users and only gets more complex/vital as data growth occurs. QuikStation is a viable tool to help smaller businesses achieve DP in a very easy and very cost-effective way, even perhaps using the removability of the RDX cartridges to help 'seed' a remote--whether owned or cloud--location."RDX continues to meet the customer segment that demands more capacity and automating of that process, says IDC's Robert Amatruda. "Having a system to extend that beyond the single cartridge is important, and with any removable media you do need a way to manage. When you move it to an automated or system environment it can be a little easier. That's why customers make the jump from a single tape drive to a system."

The whole concept behind RDX is having standards and standardized media that you can use to recover, restore and safeguard your data beyond your system, he adds. In fact, Amatruda is very positive about the foreseeable future of removable media, with new technologies and file system support coming out. "It opens the door to verticals that consume quite a bit of capacity, which hard disks don't really address. Even with the advent of cloud, it's really about recovery of data."

Arun Taneja of technology analyst firm the Taneja Group agrees that while the tape market is declining, enterprises of all sizes, but especially the larger ones, are continuing to use tape, either for compliance reasons or for internal political reasons or both. "Small companies are the ones that want to get away from tape as fast as possible. The reasons are clear. These small companies have little or no specialized expertise in IT. In other words, even if they have one or a few IT people, they are often generalists and not specialists. They want simple, easy-to-understand products that don't require a PhD to run. Tape has been a monster for these types of customers."

This is where the QuikStation comes into play, he explains. "Disk-based backups are faster and more reliable. Removability means they act like tapes and can be taken out and stored for safekeeping. No electronic replication is needed. Small to midsize companies, lower end or midsize, often don't have another site to which they can replicate. So removable disks are preferred. That is the sweet spot for the QuikStation product. Speed and reliability of disk, removability of tape."

See more on this topic by subscribing to Network Computing Pro Reports Backup 911: The Don't Panic Button.

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER
Stay informed! Sign up to get expert advice and insight delivered direct to your inbox

You May Also Like


More Insights