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Meet The People Waiting In Line For An iPhone

A small group of people began forming a line in New York City on Monday to ensure they'll be among the first to get their hands on an Apple iPhone.

Perspiration glistened on Eric Mueller's forehead. His skin baked under the midday sun, as the heat index rose to 99 degrees. Mueller held the fifth spot in an iPhone line that started forming at 5 a.m. Monday outside Apple's flagship store on Fifth Avenue in New York.

With three days to go, it seemed that nothing could deter the small group of iPhone fans who waited patiently on Tuesday to spend up to $600 for an electronic device that promises to be all things to technophiles. It'll cost another $60 to $100 a month for a service plan to make it actually work.

Twenty-one-year-old David Clayman, an Ohio native who now calls Chicago home, wasn't defeated by the heat, lack of shade or nearby showers, his parents' worries, or strange interactions with random people on New York City streets at night. He had the fourth spot in line.

"I was a cross-country runner in high school," said Clayman.

Greg Packer, first in line for an iPhone outside an Apple story in Manhattan, Wednesday's New York Daily News in which he is featured. -- Photo by Sacha Lecca

Greg Packer, first in line for an iPhone outside an Apple story in Manhattan, Wednesday's New York Daily News in which he is featured.


Photo by Sacha Lecca
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He also has a knack for making vacations -- like this one -- memorable. He's a young adventurer who, like others in line, seemed to enjoy the chance to meet all kinds of people, the novelty of being among the first in line, and the idea of actually getting one of Apple's new iPhones.

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