Unified Communications

05:13 PM
Mike Fratto
Mike Fratto
Commentary
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Google's Nexus One Smart Phone Improvements Are Incremental

Google just announced their new phone, the Nexus One. Google is claiming that the NexusOne is a new class of smart phone called a "superphone." Well, I'm not sure it is overly super, if super denotes a move from a smart phone with fairly limited computing power like a Treo or BlackBerry. In that case, the iPhone was the first phone that was super. Eye candy aside (and there is a lot of eye candy), the Nexus One is phone that has incremental processing power over the Motorola Droid, the other new

Google just announced their new phone, the Nexus One. Google is claiming that the NexusOne is a new class of smart phone called a "superphone." Well, I'm not sure it is overly super, if super denotes a move from a smart phone with fairly limited computing power like a Treo or BlackBerry. In that case, the iPhone was the first phone that was super. Eye candy aside (and there is a lot of eye candy), the Nexus One is phone that has incremental processing power over the Motorola Droid, the other new Android phone.

First, the tech specs:



















































Motorola DroidGoogle Nexus One
ProcessorTI OMAP3430Qualcomm QSD 8250
CPU Clock600 Mhz1 GHz
RAM256 MB512 MB RAM
Flash ROM512 MB512 MB ROM
Application Storage256 MB256 of 512 (unknown)
Hard Storage (microSD)Ships with 16 GB. Supports up to 32GBShips with 4GB. Supports up to 32 GB
Screen854x480 WVGA800x480 WVGA
Colors16 million, 240 DPI16 million
InputPhysical/Virtual Keyboard,
5 Way Rocker
Virtual Keyboard

The Nexus One's specs aren't that much better than those of the Motorola Droid. Most noticeable (and I don't know if this is software, hardware, or both) are the 3D graphics, which Eric Tseng from Google demonstrated with some eye catching wall papers and a photo gallery. Of course, it will only take some creative developers to show that 3D support can be used for more than eye-candy.

The other interesting hardware feature is the use of two built-in microphones for noise cancellation. Dual microphone noise cancellation has been part of higher end headsets for a few years now, but the effectiveness varies by product and environment. Essentially one mic monitors background noise while the other picks up voice, thus the phone can subtract noise from voice. That's the theory anyway, and it tends to work better in cases where there background noise is constant. However, the dual mic feature is a notable attempt at hardware improvement.

The other improvements are software based and are in Android 2.1, which Motorola said is coming to the Droid. With current Android phones, you can bring up a voice search, say what you want, and the phone will convert that to text and send the query to Google. The searches can be location specific so you can find Pizza shops nearby, for example. On the software side, Android 2.1 will support voice input into text fields. Voice input, if it works well, could be an good usability gain, but I suspect that voice input, like accessing the virtual keypad or multi-touch, depends on having the developer write support for it. It might not come pre-packaged with the applications you install.

Mike Fratto is a principal analyst at Current Analysis, covering the Enterprise Networking and Data Center Technology markets. Prior to that, Mike was with UBM Tech for 15 years, and served as editor of Network Computing. He was also lead analyst for InformationWeek Analytics ... View Full Bio
Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
This radio show will provide listeners with guidance from Dell Storage experts, who can help you explore ways to simplify workload management while achieving a balance of price and performance.
Slideshows
White Papers
Register for Network Computing Newsletters
Current Issue
2014 State of Unified Communications
2014 State of Unified Communications
If you thought consumerization killed UC, think again: 70% of our 488 respondents have or plan to put systems in place. Of those, 34% will roll UC out to 76% or more of their user base. And there’s some good news for UCaaS providers.
Video
Twitter Feed
Cartoon