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08:49 AM
Tom Trainer
Tom Trainer
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Iron Mountain Digital Steps Out Of Cloud Storage; Nirvanix Steps In

Well, it appears again that companies that are good at one thing won't necessarily be good at trying other things. Iron Mountain Digital, the public cloud offshoot from Iron Mountain--the company that stores papers in caves and giant vaults and drives around in vans all the time--has collapsed.

Well, it appears again that companies that are good at one thing won't necessarily be good at trying other things. Iron Mountain Digital, the public cloud offshoot from Iron Mountain--the company that stores papers in caves and giant vaults and drives around in vans all the time--has collapsed.

Iron Mountain Digital has been in trouble for some time now, and it's been confirmed that this public cloud business will cease operation. Apparently, the cloud business was a bit of a business mess for Iron Mountain, as the company could never really figure out how to make money at it. But, in my opinion, the problem really runs much deeper than that.

Iron Mountain is not a technology company. I would agree with Iron Mountain shareholder Paul Singer, who believes Iron Mountain is more like a real estate company. Think about it: Iron Mountain wanted to try and get into cloud storage--the latest, and most advanced form of storage available today--yet it never innovated a storage system. It never innovated any storage software IP of its own that I'm aware of. This is a company that excelled in the physical realm, took a chance on making it in the digital realm and fell flat.

Customers who have their data in the Iron Mountain public cloud now need to look elsewhere, and the top options are really a group of technology innovators such as Amazon Web Services (S3) and Nirvanix. For companies that just need scratch storage or are developing an application, Amazon S3 offers a low-cost, scalable model. For large enterprise-class companies that are looking for content collaboration, with multiple uploads and downloads planned across continents, the flat-rate services and enterprise-class multitenancy and support-type solutions from Nirvanix would make more sense.

In fact Nirvanix just rolled out a program for these abandoned Iron Mountain customers. The program migrates data to the Nirvanix public Cloud Storage Network for free (using a new sideloader that Nirvanix engineering designed) and gives them 30 days of unlimited storage capacity for free.

Tom Trainer is founder and president of analyst firm Analytico. Prior to founding Analytico, Trainer was Principal Storage Product Marketing Manager at Red Hat, and Director of Marketing at Gluster prior to its acquisition by Red Hat. Tom has worked as managing senior partner ... View Full Bio
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