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Candera Swears It's Beyond Compare

Pops out its virtualization box after three years of work. Does it have the frijoles to succeed?

Candera Inc., after pouring three years of virtual sweat into its virtualization appliance, is announcing that it's finally shipping its SCE 510 Cluster system -- and it says it's officially landed one paying customer.

The Milpitas, Calif., startup, founded in 2000 and originally called Confluence Networks, also announced it has contracted with IBM Global Services to provide around-the-clock technical support for its products, and it said it would outsource manufacturing to Sanmina-SCI Corp. (Nasdaq: SANM).

Candera's SCE 510, a purpose-built appliance with eight Fibre Channel ports, is designed to let users centralize all of their heterogeneous SAN storage into a single virtual whole with one common management interface. One of the major benefits of the appliance is that using Candera's Java-based management tool, just about any IT staffer can quickly and easily tap into the storage infrastructure (if they have permission) without having to learn any vendor-specific tool, says Stephen Terlizzi, VP of marketing and business development.

"Most organizations have one person who they trust to do the storage provisioning," he says. "They've made everything in their SAN environment redundant -- except for this one guy."

The startup claims its appliance works with just about every major storage, server, switch, and host bus adapter on the market, including storage systems from EMC Corp. (NYSE: EMC), Hewlett-Packard Co. (NYSE: HPQ), Hitachi Data Systems (HDS), IBM Corp. (NYSE: IBM), and Sun Microsystems Inc. (Nasdaq: SUNW) (see Candera Unveils Controller and Candera Gets Interoperable).

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