Wireless Infrastructure

01:45 PM
Dave Molta
Dave Molta
Commentary
50%
50%
Repost This

Metro Wi-Fi: RIP?

Rapid technology evolution and economies of scale argue against municipalities as wireless service providers. As for metro Wi-Fi, I think the future is clear. It's the wrong technology for the job.

The story gets really interesting when Comcast enters the fray, first by opposing a ballot measure that authorizes Longmont to act as a broadband service provider (it also owns a fiber network), and then by instigating the establishment of a citizens' group established to oppose efforts by Longmont to leverage their network infrastructure. Both Settles and Fleishman seem to enjoy vilifying incumbent service providers with Settles portraying Comcast as "The Empire" and their attorney as Darth Vader. I can't help but feel some empathy for this point of view, given the abysmal record service providers have in greasing the wheels of government by bankrolling campaigns of politicians and mounting various secret and not-so-secret lobbying efforts to advance their own interests. They provide great case studies for the legalized corruption that is so typical of American public policy deliberations.

Despite my skepticism about the wisdom of running a metro Wi-Fi network, I'm hoping Longmont wins the freedom to make that decision. The notion that government has an unfair advantage in providing essential services to its citizens strikes me as capitalism taken to its worst extreme. In particular, the notion that governments should be prevented from building out essential network infrastructure (e.g., running fiber through established right-of-ways), reflects a warped view that government can do no right and business can do no wrong.

If Longmont wants to run their own metro Wi-Fi network and their local political environment supports such a strategy, why should they be prevented from doing so? Is Comcast really afraid of the competition? In the end, it is likely that Longmont will conclude that other civic priorities (education, public works, parks and recreation, etc.) are worthier endeavors with greater public benefits. Rapid technology evolution and economies of scale argue against municipalities as wireless service providers. As for metro Wi-Fi, I think the future is clear. It's the wrong technology for the job.

Previous
2 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
More Blogs from Commentary
Infrastructure Challenge: Build Your Community
Network Computing provides the platform; help us make it your community.
Edge Devices Are The Brains Of The Network
In any type of network, the edge is where all the action takes place. Think of the edge as the brains of the network, while the core is just the dumb muscle.
Fight Software Piracy With SaaS
SaaS makes application deployment easy and effective. It could eliminate software piracy once and for all.
SDN: Waiting For The Trickle-Down Effect
Like server virtualization and 10 Gigabit Ethernet, SDN will eventually become a technology that small and midsized enterprises can use. But it's going to require some new packaging.
IT Certification Exam Success In 4 Steps
There are no shortcuts to obtaining passing scores, but focusing on key fundamentals of proper study and preparation will help you master the art of certification.
Hot Topics
White Papers
Register for Network Computing Newsletters
Cartoon
Current Issue
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed