Unified Communications

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Scott Kinka
Scott Kinka
Commentary
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UC Adoption In The Enterprise

A recent survey shows that unified communications is growing in the enterprise, despite many IT pros' lack of familiarity with the term.

Imagine a technology that is used by nearly half of businesses today, with more than three fourths of businesses planning to deploy the technology in the near future, yet the majority of IT pros aren’t familiar with its name. While this may sound like a riddle, it’s actually a description of the state of adoption for unified communications (UC) in the enterprise.

A recent Evolve IP survey of nearly 1,000 IT professionals and executives showed that the main disparity around UC adoption stems from IT pros’ lack of familiarity with and understanding of the term “unified communications.” More than 70% of respondents noted that they were either “not at all familiar” or just “somewhat familiar” with the term.

In general, UC is defined as the concept of consolidating phone, email, fax, chat, video, and collaboration into a single unified channel, either on a device or on a computer.

Based on the survey stats noting lack of familiarity, you would think that an IT solution with such low recognition would have no future in the enterprise. Surprisingly, just the opposite is true. After seeing the definition of the term, 40% of participants were admittedly already using components of UC, and of the respondents who were not using UC, 84% said they were considering implementing components within the next three years. This infographic has more details from the survey about UC adoption.

Regardless of actual familiarity with UC, high projected adoption rates can be tied to the clear benefits these technologies deliver. Having a consolidated and unified system of communication within your business helps to increase efficiencies and make internal operations more seamless. It can also help your business stay ahead of the competition for talent by providing cutting edge IT  and perks such as BYOD and telecommuting.

The Evolve IP survey supports that fact by showing companies with currently deployed UC components as more likely to have BYOD and work-from-home programs. Of the companies using UC, 61% offer a BYOD program and 60% offer a work-from-home program. In contrast, of the companies not using UC, 48% offer a BYOD program and 40% offer a work-from-home program

Clearly, a UC solution, which is designed to enhance productivity and collaboration regardless of location and proximity, is especially helpful for companies looking to keep their remote workers connected to staff and resources.

Despite the benefits, the lack of familiarity with UC creates major roadblocks for adopting a complete solution. How will organizations approach a UC deployment if they don’t have a clear understanding of what it is? It leads to several questions prior to a deployment. For instance, the survey revealed that the major obstacles cited were selecting the right system and provider, determining feature priorities, and employee adoption. 

So where should you start? Successful deployments begin with a thoughtful strategy to help eliminate these obstacles. To overcome system and provider selection concerns, start by examining your business needs and determine your organization’s primary communication method (be it email, phone, chat, etc.) The technology used for your primary communication method should be the cornerstone to building your UC strategy. From that point, build out and add on features and components that will create a platform that's tailored to your needs.

As with most worthwhile ventures, there is no quick fix to implementing UC. In order for your organization to fully realize the benefits, the UC system must work well and be intuitive in order to drive user adoption. Leveraging technology partners to provide insight and recommend the appropriate features for your organization will prove invaluable and have a direct impact where it matters most: the bottom line.

Scott Kinka serves as Chief Technology Officer for Evolve IP. An award-winning, 20-year technology veteran with expertise in virtualization, cloud security and telecommunications, Mr. Kinka designs the Evolve IP roadmap, leads Evolve IP's project team and works closely with ... View Full Bio
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Susan Fogarty
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Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Strategist
7/15/2014 | 9:19:18 PM
Re: Definition of UC
Hi Art, thanks for chiming in here! I think your point about "communication" is a good one -- UC platforms need to assimilate a lot of "messages" froma  wide range of sources, and that just keeps growing. We recently published another article on why UC needs to transition to unified interaction

That said, the results of this survey surprised me. If 70% of IT pros are still unfamiliar with the term "unified communications," we have a lng way to go before people are getting on board with unified interaction. How can we address that?
MarciaNWC
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MarciaNWC,
User Rank: Strategist
7/15/2014 | 12:46:12 PM
Re: Definition of UC
That makes sense. How might compliance requirements affect that cloud migration, especially for highly regulated industries? 
artr
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artr,
User Rank: Moderator
7/14/2014 | 8:03:13 PM
Re: Definition of UC
Marcia,

 

It's really very straightforward.

Users need an environment that is open, flexible, and supports all their business communication needs, not just their job responsibilities, anywhere anytime, anyhow. Unitil users had multimodal endpoint devices, it was difficult or impossible to support such capabilities, but now we can capitalize on the "clouds" to provide network access and storage flexibility across business organizations.

With mobile BYOD, we can access mobile apps that are designed for a variety of applications and for different types of end users, i.e., employes, business partners, consumers/customers. They can use applications that ontegrate more easily and interwork most flexibly when they are all in the same network ballpark that is location independent,  i.e., on the Internet.

So, UC which has to support multimodal interactions between both people and between people and automated business process applications, will find that the clouds will provide the necessary flexibility and interoperability that never could be acheived with legacy person-toperson telephony.

 
MarciaNWC
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MarciaNWC,
User Rank: Strategist
7/14/2014 | 3:53:10 PM
Re: Definition of UC
Thanks for that insight Arthur.  Your perspective of UC as "unified interactions," as you describe in this blog post is intriguing. Could you elaborate on how cloud services will facilitate UC implementation?
artr
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artr,
User Rank: Moderator
7/12/2014 | 1:34:38 PM
Definition of UC
The survey confirms the fact that there is confusion about the definition of "Unified Communications" (UC). However, the problem is that the term "communication" is still being applied primarily to person-to-person contacts, i.e., between live people. The fact is, that with rapid user adoption of mobile smartphones and tablets, there is now more contact activity being generated by automated business processes through "mobile apps" and automated, personalized "notifications."

So, it's important for business management to identify "use cases" where end users, both inside and outside of an organization, will be making contact through multimodal devices, not just a telephone, and will also need to exchange information content, not just talk.

It is also important to note that cloud services will facilitate UC implementation and integrations with business process applications, and will also lessen the dependency on internal IT resources.

You can read my posts on this subject at www.ucstrategies.com.

  
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