Unified Communications

05:00 AM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

BuzzBites: Detect This; Selling iCrack

Call centers are relying on speech-analysis and emotion-detection software. Plus, the software expert who broke Apple's iTunes copy-protection software plans to make a little scratch.

Detect This!

A growing number of call centers rely on speech-analysis and emotion-detection software. This software examines large volumes of calls for key words and phrases, or changes in a caller's volume and pitch. It analyzes the data to help business owners understand customer motivations and measure levels of satisfaction. Some software can even alert supervisors if a customer's speech pattern deviates from a known good baseline.

Given how frustrating automated answering systems are, a more sensible approach might be to actually hire real humans to take the call. But don't hold your breath; according to Forrester, speech analysis and emotion-detection software is a $400 million market and growing. --Andrew Conry-Murray, acmurray@nwc.com


Selling iCrack

Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Cartoon
Slideshows
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
Jeremy Schulman, founder of Schprockits, a network automation startup operating in stealth mode, joins us to explore whether networking professionals all need to learn programming in order to remain employed.
White Papers
Register for Network Computing Newsletters
Current Issue
2014 State of Unified Communications
2014 State of Unified Communications
If you thought consumerization killed UC, think again: 70% of our 488 respondents have or plan to put systems in place. Of those, 34% will roll UC out to 76% or more of their user base. And there’s some good news for UCaaS providers.
Video
Twitter Feed