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Sun Adds Hosting Services

Sun Microsystems announced the availability of Web deployment hosting services based on the Solaris 10 Operating System

SANTA CLARA, Calif. -- Sun Microsystems, Inc., (Nasdaq: SUNW - News) today announced the availability of Web deployment hosting services based on the Solaris(TM) 10 Operating System(OS), and industry-leading Sun systems and storage (www.sun.com/emrkt/startupessentials/hosting.jsp). By joining the Sun partner hosting initiative, Web hosting partners Joyent and NaviSite can provide low- cost infrastructure and services to help startup companies jumpstart and grow their business. This offer is available for eligible U.S. based members of the Sun Startup Essentials(SM) program (www.sun.com/startupessentials), which helps early-stage companies get to market more quickly on Sun's enterprise- class technologies at a cost that fits their needs to conserve cash.

The hosting requirements of Web 2.0 and Internet Services startups typically differ from those of traditionally established companies, due to their increased need to grow and expand services with fluctuating customer demands. Sun is working closely with Joyent and NaviSite to help address these requirements and is now able to offer these emerging companies all the advantages of the extremely flexible and scalable Solaris 10 OS based infrastructure.

"Sun is working closely with Joyent and NaviSite to help build a highly scalable hosting infrastructure for startups and established companies," said Juan Carlos Soto, vice president of Marketing at Sun Microsystems. "We are pleased that Joyent and NaviSite have chosen Solaris 10 and the Sun platform for hosting Web 2.0 applications and that they are working with Sun to provide affordable hosting plans that are flexible and easily scalable, helping startups to grow their business."

Sun Microsystems Inc.

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