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Quest's Search for Identity

Software vendor snaps up startup Vintela for $56.5 million, as the identity management feeding frenzy continues

Quest Software Inc. has stumped up $56.5 million to acquire startup Vintela Inc. (see Quest Buys Vintela) and get a bigger piece of the action in identity management.

Emerging identity management products aim to guard access to increasingly complex enterprise IT systems. But the market is just getting going, and users bemoan the lack of comprehensive "all-in-one" solutions (see CIOs Face Identity Crisis). By acquiring Vintela, Quest is looking to offer a more competitive product set.

Vintela, based in Lindon, Utah, offers a range of products designed to extend Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) Active Directory password policies into Unix and Linux-based environments. The startup also provides single sign-on capabilities across Unix, Linux, Java, and Mac platforms -- a key driver behind the acquisition, according to Phil Schacter, group service director at analyst firm Burton Group. Some Windows users also need to access Unix systems, so this allows single sign-on for the Unix platform,” he says.

Like Vintela, Quest is an Active Directory specialist. The Irvine, Calif.-based firm sells products for managing Active Directory and is now looking to extend its reach beyond the traditional Windows environment.

The deal is expected to close either late in the second quarter or early in the third quarter of this year. There are no plans for job losses at Vintela. In some areas, Quest will be making additional investments in the startup. “We haven’t figured that out in exact dollars, but in terms of headcount, we’re looking at a number of people on the engineering [side]," David Waugh, vice president for product management at Quest, tells NDCF.

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