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Linux Kernel 2.6 is Coming: What's in it for You?

2.6 addresses many of 2.4's weaknesses and folds in support for recent technologies.

Vendors are banking on that. Many server applications have been ported to Linux, but missing features like integrated JFS (Journalized File System) support have slowed adoption of these apps. With these obstacles removed, Linux will be in a better position to compete directly with Unix and Windows servers.

Near term, this will mean more choices in the data center. Some would like to think it will also mean more choices on the desktop, but barriers to entry on the desktop are likely internal; some organizations simply refuse to consider such a move. Still, the trend toward "packaged" Linux distributions--ones where you pick and choose modules to place into your distribution, such as a desktop-publishing module for your art department and an office-desktop module for your standard desktop--might provide the momentum these optimists look for when added to a more stable kernel.

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