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Google Exec Joins Facebook

Matthew Papakipos, a key leader in developing the Chrome operating system, is moving to Facebook as director of engineering.

Matthew Papakipos, who played a key role in the development of Google's Chrome operating system, is moving to Facebook as director of engineering.

"Now that Chrome OS & WebGL are in good shape, it's time for something new. I'm going to work @ Facebook! Love the product and team. Woot!" he tweeted.

During his three-year career at Google, Papakipos also worked on the Open Web Platform for Chrome OS, the Chrome GPU hardware project, and the WebGL, used for building 3-D graphics into the web. Papakipos also has held positions at PeakStream and Nvidia. Google is slated to launch the Chrome OS this fall.

"I architect complex computer systems. I've invented and patented a large number of hardware and software algorithms for solving real-world problems. I design systems that are novel, yet practical," wrote Papakipos in his online resume. "I like solving problems that seem impossible to others: making graphics chips programmable (NVIDIA), making browser apps as fast as conventional native apps (NativeClient), making web apps that use graphics hardware (WebGL), creating a new consumer operating system (Chrome OS)."

In May, another high-level Google executive headed to Facebook: Erick Tseng, senior Android project manager, was named head of mobile products at the social networking company.

Not all recent Facebook hires are Google alumni. Recently, Facebook added Jocelyn Goldfein, formerly VP and general manager of the desktop business unit at VMware, to its engineering ranks. And earlier this month the company hired Marne Levine, previously the chief of staff for the National Economic Council in Washington, D.C., as its VP of global public policy.

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