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Buffalo Adds Capacity, Cuts Wires

Vendor uses CES to introduce 1-Tbyte NAS device as well as a wireless storage center, all intended for SMB and high-capacity consumer apps.

Buffalo Technology introduced Thursday at the Consumer Electronics Show its TeraStation, a 1-terabyte network attached storage device for small and medium businesses and high-capacity consumer users.

TeraStation is Windows- and Macintosh-compatible with four hard drives of 250 gigabytes each. The product can be used in four different modes: standard mode, which allows each drive to be shared as an individual network volume; spanning mode, which merges all four drives as a single volume to create a 1-Tbyte share; mirroring mode, which creates two separate pairs of mirrored drives to prevent data loss in the event of drive failure; and RAID 5 mode, for increased performance with fault tolerance that spreads data across the four separate drives uniformly.

TeraStation offers additional data protection with its journaling file system. This allows instant data and operational recovery in the event of a system failure. The device also features UPS compatibility so the device can be safely powered down automatically or manually.

TeraStation has four USB 2.0 ports and one 10/100/1000 Gigabit Ethernet port. Up to four external USB hard drives can be connected concurrently; TeraStation also offers a print server feature so users can share a USB printer over their network, the vendor said. The product can be used as a central server so users can manage and share stored data, or as a media server when used with Buffalo's LinkTheater, which enables users to stream multimedia files directly on their television or entertainment system without the use of a media PC.

TeraStation will be available next month; estimated pricing is $1,299.

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