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World IPv6 Launch: Who's Making Progress?

An infographic from the Internet Society provides a view into how far IPv6 adoption has come in two years.

Two years ago Friday, scores of ISPs and website operators, including Internet heavyweights Google and Facebook, participated in World IPv6 Launch by permanently enabling IPv6. Organized by the Internet Society, the program was launched a year after World IPv6 Day, a 24-hour test of the new Internet protocol on websites, and was designed to encourage permanent IPv6 adoption.

Since then, IPv6 has become what the Internet Society calls "the new normal." The group released an infographic to illustrate IPv6 progress over the past two years (see below).

"Two years ago we were name-checking networks that had managed to exceed our World IPv6 Launch threshold of 1% IPv6 deployment," Mat Ford, technology program manager at the Internet Society, wrote in a blog post. "Now we report on nearly 100 networks around the world with over 10 times that much IPv6 deployment, many still growing rapidly."

Despite some of the promising statistics, Ford notes that more IPv6 deployment effort is needed in the Web content business. The percentage of Alexa top 1,000 websites reachable using IPv6 has shown only slow growth, he said.

Are you making progress with your own IPv6 adoption? Do these statistics surprise you? Let's discuss them in the comments.

Marcia Savage is the managing editor for Network Computing, and has been covering technology for 15 years. She has written and edited for CRN and spent several years covering information security for SC Magazine and TechTarget. Marcia began her journalism career in daily ... View Full Bio

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MarciaNWC
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MarciaNWC,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2014 | 6:58:34 PM
SDN and IPv6
Ivan Pepelnjak recently wrote an interesting blog post comparing SDN and IPv6 hype. His post also has a link to IPv6 resources for network designers.
OrhanErgun
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OrhanErgun,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/6/2014 | 6:56:06 PM
Re: service providers & IPv6
Yes Marcia , that is true. Many fields removed from the IPv4 header and some fields name has been changed.


Hop limit is one of them but as an answer to aditshar; although initially TTL had been thought as time limit, vendor implementation and IP stack designed around hop count for IPv4 as well.


So changing this field name in IPv6 reflects the correct usage also.


Hope to help.
MarciaNWC
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MarciaNWC,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2014 | 1:35:49 PM
Re: service providers & IPv6
Is Hop Limit what used to be called TTL (Time To Live) in IPv4?
aditshar1
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aditshar1,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/6/2014 | 5:52:10 AM
Re: service providers & IPv6
The best part with IPv6 is the Hop Limit , reflecting the fact that routers are no longer expected to compute the time a packet has spent in a queue.
MarciaNWC
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MarciaNWC,
User Rank: Strategist
6/5/2014 | 12:10:39 PM
ICANN advisory
ICANN announced late last month that it had started to allocate the last blocks of IPv4 addresses. ICANN said the move signaled that the global supply of IPv4 addresses is reaching a critical level, and it encouraged network operators worldwide to adopt IPv6.

 
MarciaNWC
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MarciaNWC,
User Rank: Strategist
6/4/2014 | 7:33:06 PM
service providers & IPv6
Mat Ford included an interesting stat in his blog about IPv6 growth in large networks: Verizon Wireless shot up from 10% IPv6 deployment two years ago to 50% today. That seems like pretty fast-paced growth.

 
RossC4464
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RossC4464,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/4/2014 | 3:49:23 PM
Watch the massive wall of apathy and ignorance on IPv6 crumble gradually over the next few years.
The content providers, vendors, and ISPs that have got us to this point are the true inovators. They've made it easier for the people working for slighly less visionary employers to continue to finally get us to the point of having enough public IP addresses.

There have been a number of relatively recent developments that help to make it achievable for more ISPs and content providers.

For example, in mobile,  Android 4.4 is the first version that an operator could launch service on without calling it a beta. That was recent, not 2 or more years ago, when jokes about IPv6 never being adopted were common. All Android 4.4+ phones are going to be ready. There was no reason for an operator to enable it before because there wasn't a phone they could supply without it being a support nightmare.

In fixed, despite, a couple of modem and home routers vendors signing up to IPv6 world day support was overwhelmingly bad. The CPE RFCs in the IETF hadn't even been finished. Well it is a lot better now, some way to go, but much better than two years ago.

The edge network support in equipment available to vendors only arrived over the course of the last couple of years. It will take another couple for this to be deployed by most operators. The more clueless ones will deploy it with IPv4 only but the feature set is there for when they finally see others are enabling it.

As more users start to get IPv6 more websites will decide to deploy it.

 

 
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