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World IPv6 Launch: Who's Making Progress?

An infographic from the Internet Society provides a view into how far IPv6 adoption has come in two years.

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AbeG
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AbeG,
User Rank: Black Belt
6/14/2014 | 11:24:05 PM
Re: Watch the massive wall of apathy and ignorance on IPv6 crumble gradually over the next few years.
"What's depressing to me is that the exhaustion of those IPv4 reserves wasn't a surprise"

A potentially surprising emerging trend seems to be emerging is where consumers are leading and the enterprises are following in some areas. 

Mass adoption of IPv6 on the part of consumers, may have started at around the time when Windows Vista was deployed.  Futher adoption continued as consumer-grade devices and services such as routers, game/media consoles, and internet service began shipping with IPv6 support enabled by default.
AbeG
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AbeG,
User Rank: Black Belt
6/14/2014 | 11:14:30 PM
Re: service providers & IPv6
@RossC4464

"The main benefit of IPv6 is the vastly greater numbers of IP addresses which removes the requirement to use NAPT."

From an internet point of view, I agree.  From a LAN point of view, I think there are some signficiant changes, particulary with respect to QoS Improvements.  A lot of the talk surrounding SDN innovation often touches on the topic optimizing network traffic on the LAN.  New fields in the IPv6 header should prove to be a important part of the optimization process.

Microsoft has a decent article on the topic:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc738582%28v=ws.10%29.aspx#w2k3tr_ipv6_what_cyoo
AbeG
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AbeG,
User Rank: Black Belt
6/14/2014 | 10:58:11 PM
Re: ICANN advisory
@Marcia, thanks for sharing that link. I didn't realize that the supply of IPv4 addresses was so close to running out. 

I would imagine that this is going to create increasingly higher prices for IPv4 addresses which should in theory compell many organizations to make the swich to IPv6.
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
6/11/2014 | 3:51:35 PM
Re: Watch the massive wall of apathy and ignorance on IPv6 crumble gradually over the next few years.

Great thoughts, and thanks for your insights.

"When IANA exhausted the top level IPv4 reserves in 2011 the exponential growth started, it is striking to compare the two graphs."

What's depressing to me is that the exhaustion of those IPv4 reserves wasn't a surprise - it was well-forecasted event, and yet still adoption leading up to that time felt like it was inching along like it wasn't happening. I perceive that things have improved vastly since then though.
RossC4464
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RossC4464,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/11/2014 | 3:46:07 PM
Re: Watch the massive wall of apathy and ignorance on IPv6 crumble gradually over the next few years.
"When I talked about the slow adoption of IPv6, I was really trying to say that these are reasons why IPv6 implemention has been deferred and delayed. I think that now we are seeing a much faster adoption rate, although I'd still argue that for most people they don't have a pressing need for IPv6.

I'd agree that for most people there isn't a pressing need. Sure, they can stretch their NAT or CGNAT some more and they can tell people looking for more public IPv4 addresses that there aren't any more of them for a low cost. The Internet is being held back by that constraint in ways that we can't fully know until we deploy IPv6 and benefit from the network effect/Metcalfe's Law of many people having public IPv6 space. While there are still hurdles, every few months more of them are being overcome, there's a growing list of networks that are doing it. When IANA exhausted the top level IPv4 reserves in 2011 the exponential growth started, it is striking to compare the two graphs. The US is doing very well, it is more that twice the global deployment level.
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
6/11/2014 | 3:27:36 PM
Re: Watch the massive wall of apathy and ignorance on IPv6 crumble gradually over the next few years.
"The IPv4v6 PDP/PDN type leaves the GGSN/PGW requiring IPv4 pools which aren't big enough for large operators."

--For IPv4 we reused the 10/8 space many times over; but that too isn't friendly to IMS-type applications.


The introduction of VoLTE provides the opportunity to use an IPv6 only IMS APN.

--Agreed; in fact I've said in the past that IMS may provide the biggest incentive for mobile operators to get their IPv6 support in place.

 

I also noted that I didn't complete my thoughts in that last comment. When I talked about the slow adoption of IPv6, I was really trying to say that these are reasons why IPv6 implemention has been deferred and delayed. I think that now we are seeing a much faster adoption rate, although I'd still argue that for most people they don't have a pressing need for IPv6.
RossC4464
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RossC4464,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/11/2014 | 3:20:25 PM
Re: Watch the massive wall of apathy and ignorance on IPv6 crumble gradually over the next few years.
"Later versions began supporting multi-protocol PDP contexts, but it takes time to get this all in play."

IPv4v6 PDP/PDN type is not as important as it used to seem when the 3GPP were doing their transition guidelines. RFC6877 has added support for a NAT64 clat in the phone. That presents an IPv4 gateway address to legacy applications like Skype that haven't yet been updated to use the v6 stack. Most apps work with NAT64/DNS64 but the few things like URLs with embedded literal IPv4 addresses and Skype need the clat. Android 4.4 has this and it is activated automtically when the PDP/PDN bearer type is IPv6. 

The IPv4v6 PDP/PDN type leaves the GGSN/PGW requiring IPv4 pools which aren't big enough for large operators. There are also roaming issues with old visited SGSNs not gracefully falling back to IPv4 when PDP Extended Type is sent by the HLR. 

 The introduction of VoLTE provides the opportunity to use an IPv6 only IMS APN.

While the level of adoption is low globally, leading operators, content providers and CDN operators are deploying it and moving a significant amount of their traffic to IPv6. The growth over the last years has been more than doubling each year.
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
6/11/2014 | 2:58:53 PM
Re: Watch the massive wall of apathy and ignorance on IPv6 crumble gradually over the next few years.
"There was no reason for an operator to enable it before because there wasn't a phone they could supply without it being a support nightmare."

True up to a point, but I'd argue that in addition, enabling IPv6 as a mobile operator is a somewhat different challenge to enabling it as a regular service provider, and it's only in part an issue of whether or not a given set of handsets support it. For UMTS operators, for a long time the issues actually stemmed from the 3GPP standard in use that only supported a PDP context that was either IPv4 or IPv6. Supporting dual stack operation - which was considered very necessary, just as it is on desktop computers - thus required the creation of two PDP contexts. The increase in mobility and session management alone would have had a tremendous impact on available capacities in most operators' networks. Later versions began supporting multi-protocol PDP contexts, but it takes time to get this all in play.

Oh, and for networks with any kind of IMS services (for example), you have to handle devices with IPv6 talking to devices with IPv4, and so on.

Add on top of that the general lack of adoption for the protocol in networks as a whole (and thorough support from networking vendors) and you have a recipe for very slow adoption.
RossC4464
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RossC4464,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/7/2014 | 12:51:14 PM
Re: service providers & IPv6
Modern hardware forwards at IPv4 at line rate so that isn't so much of a benefit as may have originally been envisaged. Similar claims were made about MPLS label switching before it was widely deployed.

The main benefit of IPv6 is the vastly greater numbers of IP addresses which removes the requirement to use NAPT.
MarciaNWC
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MarciaNWC,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2014 | 7:01:41 PM
Re: service providers & IPv6
Thanks Orhan! That's a helpful explanation.
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