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Sony Pictures Uses 'Green Power' For Data Center

Sony Pictures Entertainment is the first customer of data center operator 365 Main to sign up for a new reusable energy program.

While many companies are looking at server consolidation and virtualization as ways of reducing data center electricity consumption, Sony Pictures Entertainment is going green by using the sun, wind, and other reusable energy sources to power its data facilities.

Sony Pictures Entertainment is the first customer of data center operator 365 Main to sign up for a new reusable energy program that's being offered to clients of 365 Main's facility in Chandler, Ariz., via electrical utility company Salt River Project.

Through the Salt River Project's Earthwise Energy program, clients of 365 Main's data center in Chandler, like Sony Pictures, can sign up to power their computer center with "clean" energy sources, including sun, wind, the Earth's heat, flowing water, and decomposing trash from landfills.

"Sony Pictures is the first tenant that's thinking all the way upstream in sources of energy that can reduce its carbon footprint," said Miles Kelly, 365 Main's VP of marketing and strategy. The Chandler facility is the largest of 365 Main's five (soon to be six) data centers, he said. The San Francisco data center operator is hoping to offer reusable energy sources to clients of its other data centers whenever such programs are available by its other electricity providers, Kelly said.

"We hope this becomes a standard," he said.

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