Networking

11:08 AM
Jim Rapoza
Jim Rapoza
Commentary
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

No Data Privacy In The Cloud

Most people understand that data in the cloud won’t have the same level of security and privacy that data inside your corporate firewall has. But some recent news has shown just how insecure your cloud-based data really is.

Most people understand that data in the cloud won’t have the same level of security and privacy that data inside your corporate firewall has. But some recent news has shown just how insecure your cloud-based data really is.

My colleague Howard Marks recently wrote about the problems with the Dropbox cloud storage service, and how they exposed the accounts of users. These problems led to Howard, and many other users, dropping their own use of Dropbox.

Of course, it wasn’t just the fact that Dropbox made it possible to log into anyone’s account that was the problem (as bad as that was). It’s also the fact that Dropbox has the keys to the encryption of the data, meaning the company (or any party it chose or was forced to give the keys to) could view your data.

The importance of someone else having access to your data became even clearer during the recent Office 365 launch, when Microsoft admitted to a ZDNet reporter that it would turn over data from European companies, in European-based servers, if the data was the subject of a U.S. Patriot Act investigation or request.

Now, everyone has always known that data held in U.S.-based server locations could be the subject of a Patriot Act request, and that the businesses and persons that were the subject of the request might not ever know if their data had been turned over. But I think a lot of companies, especially overseas, were surprised to find that the U.S. government could request their non-U.S.-based data simply if the company running the service was U.S.-based.

Jim Rapoza is Senior Research Analyst at the Aberdeen Group and Editorial Director for Tech Pro Essentials. For over 20 years he has been using, testing, and writing about the newest technologies in software, enterprise hardware, and the Internet. He previously served as the ... View Full Bio
Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
Cartoon
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
Jeremy Schulman, founder of Schprockits, a network automation startup operating in stealth mode, joins us to explore whether networking professionals all need to learn programming in order to remain employed.
White Papers
Register for Network Computing Newsletters
Current Issue
2014 Private Cloud Survey
2014 Private Cloud Survey
Respondents are on a roll: 53% brought their private clouds from concept to production in less than one year, and 60% ­extend their clouds across multiple datacenters. But expertise is scarce, with 51% saying acquiring skilled employees is a roadblock.
Video
Twitter Feed