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JBoss To Show Java Industry Solidarity At JavaOne

Jboss Inc. plans to make its presence known in a big way at JavaOne 2004 this week.

Jboss Inc. plans to make its presence known in a big way at JavaOne 2004 this week, the first time that the professional open-source company has exhibited at the annual developer confab in San Francisco.

JBoss' attendance at JavaOne shows that a lot can change in a year. At last year's JavaOne, the company held its own Java forum next door in a mock protest of the conference and bickered with Sun Microsystems over J2EE licensing, a fight resolved last November when JBoss became a licensee.

Next week, JBoss CEO Marc Fleury said, the company aims to have achieved full J2EE certification with the open-source JBoss application server. JBoss also plans to demonstrate the significant work it has done in collaboration with other Java vendors to make the new Enterprise JavaBeans specification, EJB 3.0, easier for Java developersto swallow, he said.

Both milestones would mark an unprecedented spirit of Java industry cooperation by Atlanta-based JBoss, whose CEO has always been outspoken and unafraid to boast about his company or ruffle the feathers of its competitors and partners. And despite JBoss' show of solidarity with its Java peers, Fleury shows no signs of losing his edge and said he plans to exert even greater influence on the Java software market as his company continues to grow.

Whether company engineers would complete the 20,000-plus J2EE compatibility tests on the JBoss application server in time for JavaOne was iffy, Fleury told CRN earlier this week. "We'll get there, but unfortunately we don't know for sure if it will be at JavaOne," he said. At the time, Fleury said the tests were about 95 percent complete, and JBoss had half of its engineering team working around the clock to finish the certification.

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