Networking

06:54 PM
Commentary
Commentary
Commentary
50%
50%

Is Web 2.0 An Endangered Species?

Yesterday I read two articles that suggested Web 2.0 growth is stunted, if not actually in danger of stopping altogether....

Yesterday I read two articles that suggested Web 2.0 growth is stunted, if not actually in danger of stopping altogether. Both cited a report from Dow Jones VentureSource. According to the report, even though nearly $1.34 billion was invested in 178 Web 2.0 deals last year, Facebook -- Land of the SuperPoke -- accounted for about 22% of them.

VentureSource's numbers also pointed to a slowdown in the growth of Web 2.0 deals.

During the period of 2002-06, deal flow doubled each year. However, 2007 saw a smaller percentage of deals -- an increase of only 25% (178 in 2007, up from 143 in 2006). To add fuel to the speculative fire, most of this growth took place outside of the Bay area, well-established home of Web-related investment and innovation.

Should Web 2.0 advocates, pundits, and prophets be worried?

Bloggers and analysts alike have been ringing the death knell of Web 2.0 almost since it was first christened. Sites like Twitter, Digg, and Facebook are often singled out for their success in driving traffic, but inability to make any real profit. Other critics offer more unique reasons for a possible Web 2.0 collapse.

Previous
1 of 3
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Hot Topics
14
White-Box Switches: Are You Ready?
Tom Hollingsworth 7/28/2014
11
Fall IT Events: On The Road Again With 10 Top Picks
James M. Connolly, Editor in Chief, The Enterprise Cloud Site,  7/29/2014
6
Cisco Certifications Confront Changing Skills Needs
Ethan Banks, Senior Network Architect,  7/30/2014
White Papers
Register for Network Computing Newsletters
Cartoon
Current Issue
2014 Private Cloud Survey
2014 Private Cloud Survey
Respondents are on a roll: 53% brought their private clouds from concept to production in less than one year, and 60% ­extend their clouds across multiple datacenters. But expertise is scarce, with 51% saying acquiring skilled employees is a roadblock.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed