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Crystal Bedell
Crystal Bedell
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IPv6 Migration: 10 Reasons To Get Moving

You can't afford to put off that IPv6 transition any longer. Here are 10 ways migrating to the updated protocol will benefit your enterprise.
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For years, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) has encouraged organizations to migrate from IPv4 to IPv6. In the past, the effort may have seemed superfluous. With 4.3 billion unique IP addresses, IPv4 was more than sufficient to allow anyone or anything to connect to the Internet.

But a lot has changed over the last 20 years. Migrating to IPv6 is no longer a project IT organizations can afford to put on hold. Still, it may be difficult to convince upper management otherwise with high-profile projects like cloud and mobility on the docket. With that in mind, here are the top reasons why IT organizations should make an IPv6 migration a priority.

Need more specifics on IPv6? Attend IPv6 Boot Camp: Get Up to Speed Quickly at Interop New York this fall. Register now for Interop, Sept 29 to Oct. 3 in New York City.

 

Crystal Bedell is a freelance technology writer specializing in security, cloud computing and mobility. As the principal of Bedell Communications, she helps technology providers and IT media companies create engaging thought leadership content. Prior to launching Bedell ... View Full Bio

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
10/2/2014 | 12:20:02 AM
Re: Governments are setting a poor example
@AbeG: At a recent conference I attended, the advice being evangelized from the resident experts was to encourage and foster IPv6 adoption by demonstrating how great it is and the ROI at stake rather than taking the fear route.  Indeed, the enterprise is increasingly becoming both the cloud enterprise and the big data enterprise, and both of those types of enterprise are quickly becoming the IoT enterprise because of the myriad benefits for interconnectivity and big data accessibility and analytics that IoT offers -- and IoT DEPENDS upon IPv6 migration (especially if Cisco's prediction that we'll have over 50 billion devices connected by the 2020s is apt -- considering that there are only about 4.3 billion IPv4 addresses).

So, yeah, I'd use those talking points instead.  ;)
AbeG
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AbeG,
User Rank: Ninja
9/24/2014 | 1:12:20 PM
Re: Governments are setting a poor example
Perhaps an Ice Bucket challenge for IPv6 is in order.  Maybe we could start a rumor about it :)
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
9/22/2014 | 12:27:03 PM
Re: Governments are setting a poor example
Indeed, AbeG, the response by many major enterprises to the IPv4 crisis was not to expeditiously migrate to IPv6 but rather to buy up and hoard as much IPv4 space as possible.

I'm guessing the Cubs stand to win a World Series or two before we see full IPv6 migration.
AbeG
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AbeG,
User Rank: Ninja
9/16/2014 | 9:15:36 PM
Re: Governments are setting a poor example
I would like to know how many of the big IT companies have fully migrated to IPv6.  I'm willing to bet that most of them, even big names like Cisco are probably still relying on IPv4 for some of their systems.


If the big tech companies haven't fully switched, I can't see how they would be able to create the necessary momentum.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
9/14/2014 | 8:06:40 AM
Governments are setting a poor example
It doesn't help that world governments have been so slow -- and hypocritical -- in implementing IPv6 migration.

In the US, for example, the federal government was required to complete full migration by June 30, 2008.  When that deadline was missed, it set a new one for itself: 2010.  When that year came around, it pushed it off until the end of 2014.

And we're still waiting.

Similar situations have been happening at the state level, as well as in other countries, such as in the UK and throughout Africa.
Jerome Amon
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Jerome Amon,
User Rank: Ninja
9/8/2014 | 5:49:14 PM
Re: It has been too long
In my country for example, this year (2014) the IT authorities have decided the migration to IPv6.

So many big institutions, isp, .. have got their prefix and i know some of them which have already  designed the network infrastructure with IPv6 (i mean they are ready for ipv6 but they do not operate into v6). As i said, the step of the design is very very important in the case of IPv6.  I thing many companies are waiting for the ISP.
Susan Fogarty
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Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Strategist
9/8/2014 | 10:54:28 AM
Re: It has been too long
Brian, that's very true, technologies tend to hang around far longer than you expect them to. Even if an environment wants to migrate to IPv6, it is bound to have pockets of IPv4 that persist. The other day I used my credit card to pay for a taxi fare and the driver used one of those old credit card imprinters with the carbon copy receipt. I haven't seen one of those in a while! 
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
9/6/2014 | 9:22:46 PM
Re: It has been too long
Agreed, a few technologies become obsolete but they still remain present. I have heard of a few POS systems that are still using dial-up as their primary mode of connectivity.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
9/6/2014 | 9:15:45 PM
Re: It has been too long
@Susan, it is great that the best was saved for last. There might be many firms that deploy IPv6 due to the vast amount of addressable space that it enables, but then again, if there are a large number of IP addressable devices in the environment, then securing these open points that can be pinged and communicated with, become even more important.
Susan Fogarty
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Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Strategist
9/5/2014 | 1:57:31 PM
Say yes to IPv6!
OK, I know several of our bloggers and community members DO work with IPv6. Can you tell us why your network has made the migration, or if it uses IPv6 in certain cases? 
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