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iPod Touch 4G Gets Price Cut

Consumers looking to save when purchasing the new iPod touch won't get the best deal from Apple.

The new iPod touch has been on the market for less than a week, but already prices are falling—albeit not by much.

The official list price at the Apple Store for the 8GB, 32GB, and 64GB versions of the device are $229, $299, and $399, respectively. But price conscious shoppers would do better to look elsewhere online.

E-commerce giant Amazon has lowered the price by several dollars on each model. At Amazon.com, the 8GB model is now $223.99, the 32GB model is $288.99, and the 64GB version is $383.99. That's a savings of 2.2%, 3.3%, and 3.8% on each version, respectively.

Sure it's only a savings of a few bucks, but in this economy, why pay more? The catch, however, is that Amazon says its delivery window for the new iPod touch models is anywhere from one to three weeks, while Apple is pledging to ship the devices within three to five days.

The most expensive of the major electronics outlets in terms of iPhone 4G pricing is Best Buy. The chain store has added 99 cents to the sticker prices offered by Apple for each model. All three shops—Apple Store, Amazon, and Best Buy offer free shipping.

Driving demand is the fact that iPod touch 4G is loaded with new features borrowed from the hot selling iPhone 4, including Retina Display, FaceTime video conferencing, and the iOS 4.1 operating system.

"We've put our most advanced technology inside the new iPod touch," said Apple CEO Steve Jobs, at a launch event last week.

"Whether you're listening to music, playing games, making FaceTime video calls, browsing the Web, capturing HD video or watching TV shows and movies, the new iPod touch with its Retina display, A4 chip, and 3-axis gyro is more fun than ever," said Jobs.

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