Networking

03:47 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

How-To: Teach Linux To Do Windows, Part 1

Now is the time for system builders and their clients to learn Linux.

Now is the time for system builders and their clients to learn Linux. The best way to learn a new OS is to use it regularly. However, to use Linux regularly, you must either convert all your data files for use with Linux applications where they are available, or find a way to keep the legacy files accessible via access to Windows applications running over Linux. In this Recipe, I will show you how.

You can do this. I started this article in a Windows text editor. I am finishing this article in Linux OpenOffice, after which I will save it back to a Windows Word .doc file for my editor and submit it for publication using my Windows copy of Eudora. The screenshots I took using Linux K-Snapshot were converted to .jpg and edited using Windows PaintShopPro. I am not a hardcore l33t uber-h4xxor, and you don't have to be to be one, either.

This Recipe will tell you what I wish I'd known when I started this process. It will give you information you won't be able to find in online tutorials, forum posts, and vendor docs without doing a lot of research when you need the information right now. If you don't find it here, check the resources I recommend elsewhere in the article.

But you cannot get away with not learning at least the basic Linux commands. These include getting around a directory tree, changing Linux file access permissions and file ownership, etc. I omit this information here because there isn't room and because this has been very well done by others. A copy of Linux for Dummies or a ...For Dummies book more specific to your Linux distribution will also be a good thing to have on hand.

Why Bother?

Previous
1 of 32
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
Cartoon
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
Jeremy Schulman, founder of Schprockits, a network automation startup operating in stealth mode, joins us to explore whether networking professionals all need to learn programming in order to remain employed.
White Papers
Register for Network Computing Newsletters
Current Issue
2014 Private Cloud Survey
2014 Private Cloud Survey
Respondents are on a roll: 53% brought their private clouds from concept to production in less than one year, and 60% ­extend their clouds across multiple datacenters. But expertise is scarce, with 51% saying acquiring skilled employees is a roadblock.
Video
Twitter Feed