Networking

09:00 AM
Mike Fratto
Mike Fratto
Commentary
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Brocade And Cisco Maintain SAN Lock-In Status Quo With FCoE

If you are a storage administrator, you are used to vendor lock-in driven by your storage vendor and you choose SAN equipment based on a qualified equipment list. You might even defend the lock-in as being preferable. If you are a network administrator looking at FCoE, you are going to chafe under these restrictions because you'll find your product choices restricted to whatever products the SAN vendor, Brocade or Cisco, has qualified with. If you go off the qualified equipment list, you won't g

If you are a storage administrator, you are used to vendor lock-in driven by your storage vendor and you choose SAN equipment based on a qualified equipment list. You might even defend the lock-in as being preferable. If you are a network administrator looking at FCoE, you are going to chafe under these restrictions because you'll find your product choices restricted to whatever products the SAN vendor, Brocade or Cisco, has qualified with. If you go off the qualified equipment list, you won't get support, and you will continue to pay comparatively high prices for what should be commodity equipment and features. Both Brocade and Cisco are trying to maintain the status quo in storage by standards and non-standards based protocols for the same functions forcing you into making a difficult choice and potentially locking out competitors.

Cisco gets beat up when it comes out with protocols that are not standards-compliant. I have taken my swipes at Cisco for continuing to support Cisco's Discovery Protocol (CDP) when the IEEE Link Layer Discovery Protocol has been out for years. I brought up the standards issue during a small meeting with tech reporters and Cisco CEO John Chambers at CiscoLive. Both Brocade and Cisco are splitting the SAN market again on what appears to be a difference in interpretation of FCoE.

In a recent survey of 468 IT professionals, Networking Vendors: IT Pro Ranking [registration required],  about important data center features, adherence to industry standards was #2 behind virtualization. Proprietary technology in advance of standards was number 15 out of 15 features. Now it's Brocade's turn. The company's version of Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) doesn't use the required link state protocol, IS-IS, but like Cisco, Brocade says its version of TRILL will be standards compliant. Something stinks.

To be fair, there aren't any TRILL-compliant implementations yet because TRILL hasn't been ratified by the IETF. It's with the IETF RFC editor queue, but for all intents and purposes, the standard is as good as complete. Brocade's disconnect with TRILL is that section 4.2 of the TRILL draft states that TRILL uses IS-IS for the link state protocol (the other multi-path protocol, Shortest Path Bridging, also uses IS-IS). Brocade's TRILL implementation uses Fabric Shortest Path First (FSPF), a link state protocol that Brocade uses in its FC SAN products. I came across this nugget while tracking down some questions on Brocade's Virtual Chassis System (VCS).

At first I thought I misunderstood Brocade's statement. Erik Pounds, senior product manager with Brocade clarified. He said "Brocade's initial implementation of TRILL uses FSPF. FSPF has been fully tested and is proven to build fabrics in data center environments. IS-IS with L2 extensions will be the industry standard. Once the L2 extensions to IS-IS become standardized and are implemented by other vendors, we will, via a firmware update, enable interoperability in those standards-based TRILL environments." FSPF may or may not be better, but using it rather than IS-IS means Brocade's version of TRILL is non-standard.

Mike Fratto is a principal analyst at Current Analysis, covering the Enterprise Networking and Data Center Technology markets. Prior to that, Mike was with UBM Tech for 15 years, and served as editor of Network Computing. He was also lead analyst for InformationWeek Analytics ... View Full Bio
Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Cartoon
Slideshows
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
Jeremy Schulman, founder of Schprockits, a network automation startup operating in stealth mode, joins us to explore whether networking professionals all need to learn programming in order to remain employed.
White Papers
Register for Network Computing Newsletters
Current Issue
2014 Private Cloud Survey
2014 Private Cloud Survey
Respondents are on a roll: 53% brought their private clouds from concept to production in less than one year, and 60% ­extend their clouds across multiple datacenters. But expertise is scarce, with 51% saying acquiring skilled employees is a roadblock.
Video
Twitter Feed