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11 Security Sights Seen Only At Black Hat

Who says fun, sun, malware, and penetration testing don't mix? This year's Black Hat conference in Las Vegas offered information security training, hardware hacking, pool time, and more.
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A team from the University of Washington detailed its Control-Alt-Hack card game at this year's Black Hat, which uses game mechanics licensed from Steve Jackson Games. The game--for three to six players, ages 14 and up, with a playing time of about an hour--puts players in the shoes of employees of a small, elite, white-hat hacking firm. Set to debut this fall and retail for about $30 per copy, the developers--thanks to grants from Intel, the National Science Foundation, and the Association for Computing Machinery--are also making some copies available for free to educators.

Control-Alt-Hack co-creator Tamara Denning, a PhD student at the University of Washington, shows off printer proofs of the Control-Alt-Hack card game. Photograph by Mathew J. Schwartz.

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PJS880
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PJS880,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/2/2012 | 12:14:46 PM
re: 11 Security Sights Seen Only At Black Hat
The whole conference looked like it was a blast to attend and learn some state of the art defensive techniques. I have to make it to one of these I would love to sit through most of these speakers that attend. I have heard many different opinions in what the key theme was at the Black Hat conference, did anyone attend? What was in your opinion the theme of the conference that you viewed?

Paul Sprague
InformationWeek Contributor
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