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LTE Broadcast On The Horizon
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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
8/4/2014 | 7:23:05 AM
Re: Cutting the cords!
@Pablo: 200/200?  Sweet.  Here I am stuck with "15" (I put that in quotes because it rarely gets close to that).

But yes, I was thinking about that, so I might take a test run with a 4G device -- without ditching cable immediately -- and see how it goes for a year.
Pablo Valerio
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Pablo Valerio,
User Rank: Author
8/1/2014 | 5:16:04 AM
Re: Cutting the cords!
Joe, I wouldn't cut the broadband cable just yet. LTE and 3G are saturated in most metropolitan areas and there are many factors that affect performance.

Here in Barcelona we suffer slow cellular at the city center and around the main tourist spots because of the amount of devices connected to few cells.

FTTH is being deployed everywhere in the city now, I'm getting 200/200 mbps next week.
Pablo Valerio
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Pablo Valerio,
User Rank: Author
8/1/2014 | 5:10:37 AM
Re: challenges?
Abe, that is true for most cellular operators.

But LTE Broadcast requires only a small investment over exsisting LTE cells. The biggest investment will be on stadiums and conference venues, but it could be very profitable.

Fran Shammo - Verizon CFO said at Deutsche Bank Media, Internet and Telecom Conference "...if everybody in this room was too watch the same video today, we probably would bring down the cell site because there wouldn't be enough channels in that cell site to deliver that same video to everybody. With multicast, it is one channel and one cell site and you can all watch the same video on that one channel. And that is the ability of what multicast can bring."

And Verizon and others can use one channel but charge every user for the data consumed.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
7/31/2014 | 11:44:05 PM
Re: challenges?
@AbeG: That's sort of a Catch-22, huh?  New technology creates more demand, but the new technology doesn't get widely deployed because carriers want to see the "demand" first.

Big economic difference between what you're actually selling/using and what the real demand is.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
7/31/2014 | 11:41:55 PM
Re: challenges?
@Marcia: There are also the typical technological challenges, I imagine -- such as when weather can sometimes make 4G coverage spotty and whatnot (which just happened to me last week during a series of rain/thunderstorms ).  In spots where the coverage is SUPER fast when the skies are clear, streaming media has been pretty much impossible for me sometimes in bad weather.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
7/31/2014 | 11:37:48 PM
Cutting the cords!
This is fantastic news!  I've been considering cutting my Broadband entirely and going all 4G.  This is certainly a huge incentive (considering I cut cable TV years ago).
AbeG
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AbeG,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2014 | 10:45:05 PM
Re: challenges?
I've come across information in the past basically stating that verizon won't build more capacity unless there is more demand in the marketplace. 

I believe "demand" is just a euphemism for more money from consumers.  Although they were talking about more capacity through additional cell towers, I think that multicast would also fit the bill.  Verizon is already the most expensive of the big three and I would be surprised if they managed to raise their prices even higher.
Jeff Jerome
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Jeff Jerome,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/31/2014 | 10:17:11 PM
Re: challenges?
And with more and more millennial's cutting the cable cord there needs to be an alternative to broadcast TV and or cable TV.  The ripple effect will be interesting to watch.  Historically I had been concerned that the content would be lost but as we have seen premium cable TV providers, content delivery networks (Netflix) have found ways to get their own original content out there and doing well.
MarciaNWC
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MarciaNWC,
User Rank: Strategist
7/31/2014 | 5:07:00 PM
Re: challenges?
I see, thanks Pablo. I can imagine pricing being an issue since operators usually always find a way to charge a premium it seems.
Pablo Valerio
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Pablo Valerio,
User Rank: Author
7/31/2014 | 12:57:27 PM
Re: challenges?
Marcia, I believe LTE Broadcast is a Win-Win technology both for operators and users.

For operators it is an easy upgrade of their LTE networks, for consumers it is a way to get great performance when sctreaming content during events.

Most of the LTE  smartphones and tablets released in past 12 months are already compatible with the technology and all the new models should be prepared.

One obstacle could be pricing. Some users won't be happy if operators want to charge the same for content delivered by multicast. But, if used correctly, the technology could relieve the network of so many connections in one location and improve user experience.
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