Comments
UC Adoption In The Enterprise
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
artr
100%
0%
artr,
User Rank: Strategist
7/12/2014 | 1:34:38 PM
Definition of UC
The survey confirms the fact that there is confusion about the definition of "Unified Communications" (UC). However, the problem is that the term "communication" is still being applied primarily to person-to-person contacts, i.e., between live people. The fact is, that with rapid user adoption of mobile smartphones and tablets, there is now more contact activity being generated by automated business processes through "mobile apps" and automated, personalized "notifications."

So, it's important for business management to identify "use cases" where end users, both inside and outside of an organization, will be making contact through multimodal devices, not just a telephone, and will also need to exchange information content, not just talk.

It is also important to note that cloud services will facilitate UC implementation and integrations with business process applications, and will also lessen the dependency on internal IT resources.

You can read my posts on this subject at www.ucstrategies.com.

  
MarciaNWC
100%
0%
MarciaNWC,
User Rank: Strategist
7/14/2014 | 3:53:10 PM
Re: Definition of UC
Thanks for that insight Arthur.  Your perspective of UC as "unified interactions," as you describe in this blog post is intriguing. Could you elaborate on how cloud services will facilitate UC implementation?
artr
100%
0%
artr,
User Rank: Strategist
7/14/2014 | 8:03:13 PM
Re: Definition of UC
Marcia,

 

It's really very straightforward.

Users need an environment that is open, flexible, and supports all their business communication needs, not just their job responsibilities, anywhere anytime, anyhow. Unitil users had multimodal endpoint devices, it was difficult or impossible to support such capabilities, but now we can capitalize on the "clouds" to provide network access and storage flexibility across business organizations.

With mobile BYOD, we can access mobile apps that are designed for a variety of applications and for different types of end users, i.e., employes, business partners, consumers/customers. They can use applications that ontegrate more easily and interwork most flexibly when they are all in the same network ballpark that is location independent,  i.e., on the Internet.

So, UC which has to support multimodal interactions between both people and between people and automated business process applications, will find that the clouds will provide the necessary flexibility and interoperability that never could be acheived with legacy person-toperson telephony.

 
MarciaNWC
50%
50%
MarciaNWC,
User Rank: Strategist
7/15/2014 | 12:46:12 PM
Re: Definition of UC
That makes sense. How might compliance requirements affect that cloud migration, especially for highly regulated industries? 
Susan Fogarty
50%
50%
Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Strategist
7/15/2014 | 9:19:18 PM
Re: Definition of UC
Hi Art, thanks for chiming in here! I think your point about "communication" is a good one -- UC platforms need to assimilate a lot of "messages" froma  wide range of sources, and that just keeps growing. We recently published another article on why UC needs to transition to unified interaction

That said, the results of this survey surprised me. If 70% of IT pros are still unfamiliar with the term "unified communications," we have a lng way to go before people are getting on board with unified interaction. How can we address that?
Jeff Jerome
50%
50%
Jeff Jerome,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/24/2014 | 10:56:29 PM
Re: Definition of UC depends on your role
The term Unified Communications or UC means different things to different people.  And your use of or definition of UC is directly associated with your role and needs.  We all wear blinders at one time or another.  Ask Cisco what UC means to them, Ask Avaya what it means to them, Ask Polycom what it means to them ask Microsoft what it means to them and then ask a typical CIO who uses all those products and guess what?  Their understanding of the term may be skewed or even blurred.
artr
100%
0%
artr,
User Rank: Strategist
7/25/2014 | 2:51:32 AM
Re: Definition of UC depends on your role
Jerome,

Not exactly right!

UCaaS is necessary to support both BYOD and what each individual end user needs for both their job roles AND personal business role needs as a consumer/customer ("Dual Personas").

Handling all modes of contact and interaction between both people and with automated applications (not just person-to-person contacts) has become too complex and end users need communications to be more controllable as contact initiators and as recipients, more simplified, and more time efficient to avoid big mistakes, and more acceptable for the dynamic needs of all mobile users.
artr
100%
0%
artr,
User Rank: Strategist
7/25/2014 | 4:15:57 AM
Re: Definition of UC
Susan,

Don't be surprised about IT pros not understanding what end users want from UCaaS. They are not the only ones. The flexibility of UC will pay off most for mobile users, who will be more accessible and, with multimodal smartphones and tablets, can exploit UCaaS for all their job and personal business contact needs.

Mobile business apps in the "clouds" are where flexible UC options will be increasingly embedded for "click-to-contact" with people, and CEBP will deliver personalized notifications from busines process applications to end users, wherever they may be.
Jeff Jerome
50%
50%
Jeff Jerome,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/25/2014 | 10:53:19 AM
Re: Definition of UC depends on your role

@ artr - Okay I will play the role of the antagonist.  Your comment "UCaaS is necessary to support both BYOD and what each individual end user needs for both their job roles AND personal business role needs as a consumer/customer ("Dual Personas")" frankly solidifies my comment that the definition of UC is dependent on your point of view, your role and if you are an end user, vendor or manufacture.  And UCaaS, I am curious about how does that integrate into disparate technologies?   Can you please unpack that for me?  I am sure that I am not the only curious one out there in UC land.

artr
50%
50%
artr,
User Rank: Strategist
7/25/2014 | 1:58:00 PM
Re: Definition of UC depends on your role
Jeff,

The big challenge for allowing a mobile end user to exploit the flexibility of UC for all interactions (business apps, communication apps) from a single multimodal  device, is to have all those apps being able to interoperate and integrate with shared user data quickly and easily. That's not so doable when those apps are in premise-based silos and using the PSTN for connectivity. By putting them into hosted/managed service "clouds" they are more easily accessible through IP connectivity and can also benefit from having unlimited amounts of storage.

So, basically UCaaS realy needs to be cloud-based service to provide all that flexibility to individual end users and their mutlimodal (but "dumb") endpoints, rather than be limited by job-related, premise-based hardware and software. When it comes to security, that is really a function for individual applications to control, in terms of authenticated identity access, user's rights, and using encryption-protected network connections. 

The application "smarts" and access controls to information should be centralized in the service provider servers, not the access endpoints or networks. That's my perspective for the future of personalized services for individual end users who will be interacting with all kinds of business processes and people, either as a contact initiator or a recipient, through IP connected "cloud" services.

IBM's recent partnership announcement with Apple in developing "mobile apps" for enterprise oganizations is clear confirmation that this is the future for mobile consumers and employees.

 
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


Cartoon
Slideshows
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
Jeremy Schulman, founder of Schprockits, a network automation startup operating in stealth mode, joins us to explore whether networking professionals all need to learn programming in order to remain employed.
White Papers
Register for Network Computing Newsletters
Current Issue
2014 State of Unified Communications
2014 State of Unified Communications
If you thought consumerization killed UC, think again: 70% of our 488 respondents have or plan to put systems in place. Of those, 34% will roll UC out to 76% or more of their user base. And there’s some good news for UCaaS providers.
Video
Twitter Feed