Data centers

11:43 PM
Art Wittmann
Art Wittmann
Commentary
Connect Directly
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
Repost This

HP-UX Gets New Features

It's like watching grass grow, but less exciting. Every three years, HP puts out a new version of HP-UX 11i, then every six months it issues updates and patches, more or less like Microsoft releases service packs....

It's like watching grass grow, but less exciting. Every three years, HP puts out a new version of HP-UX 11i, then every six months it issues updates and patches, more or less like Microsoft releases service packs. So there wasn't really any news in this latest, except to say that HP had released an update to 11i-v3. In February, when the orginal release came, there were significant upgrades, including performance improvements and a new file system that can address 100 zettabytes.

The operating system also gets an update to its physical partitioning features -- something that sets it apart from Sun and IBM. Essentially, SuperDome servers can allocate and deallocate cell boards (two- and four-processor blades with lots of memory), creating electrically isolated partitions. Security and fault tolerence are the benefits.

But what really struck me about my conversation with HP was its commitment to platforms that will never grow significantly. For instance, HP still maintains OpenVMS to the extent that it has ported it from the Alpha processor -- which it still supports -- to the Itanium, which is the processor of choice for HP's business-critical computing group.

There's a good reason, of course. For example, the U.S. Postal Service still runs its mail sorters on OpenVMS; that's a pretty big customer to leave without an upgrade path, so HP created one.

There's no doubt about the wisdom of "if it ain't broke, don't fix it," but one wonders about the wisdom of not finding a way to migrate OpenVMS or Alpha users, or PA-RISC users for that matter, to newer platforms and operating systems. The Alpha hasn't been updated since 2003 and the PA-RISC hasn't been updated since 2005.

Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
More Blogs from Commentary
Infrastructure Challenge: Build Your Community
Network Computing provides the platform; help us make it your community.
Edge Devices Are The Brains Of The Network
In any type of network, the edge is where all the action takes place. Think of the edge as the brains of the network, while the core is just the dumb muscle.
SDN: Waiting For The Trickle-Down Effect
Like server virtualization and 10 Gigabit Ethernet, SDN will eventually become a technology that small and midsized enterprises can use. But it's going to require some new packaging.
IT Certification Exam Success In 4 Steps
There are no shortcuts to obtaining passing scores, but focusing on key fundamentals of proper study and preparation will help you master the art of certification.
VMware's VSAN Benchmarks: Under The Hood
VMware touted flashy numbers in recently published performance benchmarks, but a closer examination of its VSAN testing shows why customers shouldn't expect the same results with their real-world applications.
Hot Topics
2
IT Certification Exam Success In 4 Steps
Amy Arnold, CCNP/DP/Voice,  4/22/2014
1
The Ideal Physical Network
Martin Casado 4/23/2014
White Papers
Register for Network Computing Newsletters
Cartoon
Current Issue
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed