Careers & Certifications

01:30 AM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Tek-Tools Debuts -- Again

Can a small, brand-new SRM company make a mark in today's market?

Storage software startup Tek-Tools Inc. emerged in Dallas on Tuesday, announcing that it's shipping the industry's first” Web-based storage resource management (SRM) application (see Tek-Tools Proffers Profiler).

Storage Profiler 1.1 lets businesses more efficiently manage their servers, databases, and storage devices in a multivendor environment, Tek-Tools officials said. It lets users view current and projected disk capacity, along with statistics on CPU, memory, network, and disk performance -- all in a browser.

There are two parts to the Java-based software tool: a package that resides on a central server to gather data from multiple devices and servers in order to build reports; and agent software that resides on all the remote servers that need to be monitored. SNMP is used to provide basic alerts from storage arrays attached to the servers. The central server package communicates with all the remote agents via Ethernet. From a browser, an adminstrator can look into the server and get an update on what all the remote devices are doing.

“People spend hours meshing spreadsheets together from various servers and storage devices -- Storage Profiler eliminates this,” says Jill Huntington-Lee, VP of marketing for Tek-Tools.

Customers seem to be benefiting from the product. "These features are extremely valuable to us,” says Robert Mullins, systems coordinator at Nahan Printing Inc. This company has over 3.5 terabytes of storage spread over multiple servers, a storage area network, and different disk arrays. “Storage Profiler allows us to evaluate, manage, report, and anticipate issues with storage space and server reliability on our network,” Mullins says.

Previous
1 of 3
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
Cartoon
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
Jeremy Schulman, founder of Schprockits, a network automation startup operating in stealth mode, joins us to explore whether networking professionals all need to learn programming in order to remain employed.
White Papers
Register for Network Computing Newsletters
Current Issue
Video
Twitter Feed