Careers & Certifications

07:00 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Schools Lack Cybersecurity Training As Students Grow Cybersavvy

The School Safety Index indicates that while 95% of districts surveyed are blocking Web sites, only 38% have a closed network that lets them control the content students can access.

Schools need to take the lead in educating kids about the dangers of the Internet, taking into account the fact that their students are growing increasingly tech-savvy every year. Those are the main findings of the School Safety Index published Tuesday by CDW Government Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of CDW Corp., which sells IT products and services to schools and government agencies.

CDW-G's School Safety Index is a research project to benchmark the status of public school districts' safety and emergency response programs. It's based on 14 elements of physical and cybersafety -- including data monitoring, security software, and safety education -- and includes responses from 381 school district IT and security directors.

The School Safety Index indicates that while 95% of districts surveyed are blocking Web sites, 89% are placing computer monitors so that adults in the classroom can see them, and 81% are monitoring student Internet activity, only 38% have a closed district network that provides them with control over the content students can access and the communications they can send and receive. For those who do have a closed network, an emerging challenge for educators and IT directors is the ability of tech-savvy students to build proxy sites that get around closed networks.

On a positive note, nearly every district surveyed said is has an acceptable-use policy that defines how students are permitted to use school computers and networks. Still, 37% say they update these policies less than once annually. And only 8% of districts provide cybersafety training to students. Respondents indicated that they rely more on filtering software to protect networks than on actively engaging students to be part of the safety solution.

"Popular social networking sites such as Facebook have just opened up to high school users in the last year, which means that many districts have no stated policy about students using district resources, especially bandwidth, to access these sites," Bob Kirby, senior director of grades K-12 for CDW-G, said in a statement.

Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Cartoon
Slideshows
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
Jeremy Schulman, founder of Schprockits, a network automation startup operating in stealth mode, joins us to explore whether networking professionals all need to learn programming in order to remain employed.
White Papers
Register for Network Computing Newsletters
Current Issue
Video
Twitter Feed