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Panda Releases New Series Of Network Security Appliances

Devices are designed to fight viruses, control spam, and filter out non-business or unapproved web surfing.

Panda Software has launched a series of security network appliance designed to fight viruses, control spam, and filter out non-business or unapproved web surfing. The Panda GateDefender 8000 series includes four devices, designed for companies ranging from small businesses to large enterprises.

The devices can scan traffic at up to 30 Mbps and up to 600,000 messages per hour, with a minimum drain on network resources, according to Panda officials. It is designed to protect the corporate network perimeter against viruses, worms, and Trojans, detecting and eliminating malicious code in the six most widely-used protocols: HTTP, FTP, SMTP, POP3, IMAP4 and NNTP.

Additionally, the devices incorporate an anti-spam engine combining four spam detection techniques, and use Bayesian techniques with more than 300,000 algorithms for reducing false spam positives. The series also gives administrators control over the use of network resources, allowing them to block access to unsuitable Internet content.

The Panda GateDefender 8000 series is designed to work in any network environment, regardless of size or topology. Panda GateDefender 8050 is designed for businesses with up to 25 users; the Panda GateDefender 8100 is for companies with between 25 and 500 computers, while Panda GateDefender 8200 includes two processors to enable it to protect networks with more than 500 users.

Scanning capacity varies from model to model: Panda GateDefender 8050 reaches a rate of 5 Mbps and 120,000 messages per hour; Panda GateDefender 8100 can scan at up to 14 Mbps and 300,000 messages per hour and Panda GateDefender 8200 scans 600,000 messages per hour and at a rate of 30 Mbps.

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