Careers & Certifications

04:00 AM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

NWC Interview: McAfee's Dave Dewalt

The CEO and President of McAfee dismisses Microsoft and Cisco, talks about opportunities in data-loss prevention and whether standalone security companies are an endangered species.

What's it like to come onboard a company facing incredible competitive pressures, executive turmoil--you're the fourth CEO in six years--and a stock-options back-dating scandal?

When you break it down, is there really competitive pressure, or is it just the mystique of Microsoft or Cisco competing with you? It's much more of the mystique. The competition of Microsoft and Cisco is not that real for us and what we do.

Here's a company that's growing nine consecutive quarters in a row, with record revenues. Yes, it's had its stock-options challenges. So have a lot of public companies. The good news is the company is coming out the other end. The last quarter we announced the SEC preclearance letter finally is under way, which means the next thing is to be back on file with the SEC.

Yes, we've had executive turnover, but that's an opportunity too. I've had a chance to bring world-class new management into the company, augment the management that's there, and help grow this company. The company has grown 16 percent compounded year over year. So most of those [problems] are superficial. When you look at the fundamentals, McAfee is a strong company.



Dave Dewalt, the CEO and president of Mcafee dismisses Cisco and Microsoft, and sees opportunities in data-loss prevention.

NWC Interview Podcasts

Three or four years ago, the security market was dominated by pure-play security vendors. Now Symantec has branched out into storage and management, ISS is a small division of IBM, and RSA is a part of EMC. Are standalone security companies an endangered species?

Previous
1 of 3
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
Cartoon
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
Jeremy Schulman, founder of Schprockits, a network automation startup operating in stealth mode, joins us to explore whether networking professionals all need to learn programming in order to remain employed.
White Papers
Register for Network Computing Newsletters
Current Issue
Video
Twitter Feed