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I Gotta Be Me (and not You)

Our unplanned series of podcasts on identity theft and personal information safety continues this week. I wish I could say that I had carefully thought out a theme for the late Summer, but serindipity gets the credit--I'm just pleased to...

Our unplanned series of podcasts on identity theft and personal information safety continues this week. I wish I could say that I had carefully thought out a theme for the late Summer, but serindipity gets the credit--I'm just pleased to take advantage of the situation. I'm pleased because I think (occasionaly worm outbreak notwithstanding) that keeping customer information safe is the most significant issue in network security today. Frankly, the only other issue that comes close is infrastructure (switch and router) security, and you'll be hearing more about that from us in weeks to come. This week, I had a chance to interview David Zumwalt, the president and CEO of Privacy, Inc.. David has some fascinating things to say about the topic, along with some solid tips for security professionals, and you can hear him talk about them here, in this week's podcast.

If you you haven't already subscribed to the podcast, look over to the left, you'll find the link to subscribe to the Security Channel podcast. In addition, I'd like to ask a favor. Take a minute to drop me a note at cfranklin@cmp.com, and let me know what you'd like to hear in future podcasts. A podcast can be short or long, serious or amusing, hands-on or quite strategic. Let me know what you'd like to listen to, and we'll do our best to make it happen.

The music in this podcast is "Tito on Timbales" from Musica Unidos de Latino America. If you enjoy Latin music, there's some great stuff on their web site, along with links to order DVDs and CDs.

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