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DreamFactory 6.0 Ends Web App Development Nightmares

Development software lets even nonprogrammers develop useful interfaces for Web services.

DreamFactory is available in developer, professional or enterprise editions. All three take advantage of the same run-time engine. The only difference between professional and enterprise is project management--professional assumes the project repository is local, whereas enterprise offers a Web-based project-management interface, allowing for team development and enterprisewide sharing.

Licensing is controlled by the run-time, which requests authentication from a DreamFactory license file on the server. Every run-time installation has a 30-day unrestricted license, and applications won't run after 60 days without a valid license file.

Good
  • Newly created applications immediately available online
  • Apps customizable via JavaScript and Visual Basic
  • Browser-based development
  • Even nonprogrammers can develop useful apps
  • Product relies on existing standards
  • Bad

  • No support for Linux or Unix clients
  • Deployment can be pricey
  • DREAMFACTORY 6.0, $25 per user per month, $50 per developer per month. DreamFactory Software, (888) 399-3732, (408) 399-7454. www.dreamfactory.com
    Project security is not a function of DreamFactory. Permissions to create, edit and delete projects must be designated on the server housing the repository. DreamFactory says the simplest method of securing projects is via access-control lists, such as .htaccess for Apache--but to truly succeed in the enterprise, it will have to do better. WebDAV (Web-Distributed Authoring and Versioning) integration would be a welcome addition.

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