Careers & Certifications

04:00 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Cyberattack Fools You Once, Evades Detection

The attacks represent a "quantum leap" for hackers in terms of their technological sophistication and pose a serious challenge to the IT community, one security firm reports.

Cyberattackers have adapted the ability of Web sites to analyze the demographics of site visitors in order to create a new breed of drive-by malware downloads that defy detection.

These so-called "evasive attacks," as labeled by Web security appliance maker and security researcher Finjan in its most recent Web security trends report, are especially sneaky because they infect visitors only once before fading into obscurity.

Here's how evasive attacks work: A malware writer finds a vulnerability in a Web site and infects that site with malware that can deliver a virus or some other malicious payload to unsuspecting site visitors. When someone visits the infected Web site, the malware identifies the visitor by his IP address, browser version, and other data. The infected site does an IP lookup to see if that visitor has already visited the site.

If the visitor is new to the site, the site will deliver its malicious payload. If the visitor has already been to the site -- and has already been infected -- "the site will actually serve the site's real Web pages and traces of the malicious code are hidden," Finjan CTO Yuval Ben-Itzhak told InformationWeek.

The malware restricts access to the malicious code to a single view from each unique IP address. "This can keep security vendors from developing signatures against the malicious code," he added. "It's considered evasive because you see the attack only once."

Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
Cartoon
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
Jeremy Schulman, founder of Schprockits, a network automation startup operating in stealth mode, joins us to explore whether networking professionals all need to learn programming in order to remain employed.
White Papers
Register for Network Computing Newsletters
Current Issue
Video
Twitter Feed