Careers & Certifications

09:30 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Coghead Closure Shows the Risks of Cloud Computing

Cloud computing is growing, but no matter what the vendor, customers should have a good emergency-exit strategy

Govind Davis, a Coghead Inc. customer, didn't see its sudden closing coming. Enticed by the cloud computing vendor's low-cost service, Davis built some of his customers' applications using Coghead's online database. Now his company, MCF Technology, has nine weeks to extract data from Coghead and build new applications for it, some of which will run on Intuit Inc. (Nasdaq: INTU)'s QuickBase, also in the cloud.

Davis is still a huge proponent of cloud computing -- but a wiser one. "We'll be a little more wary with startups, as we realize the risk of going with one can be real," Davis said.

On Tuesday, a few days after Coghead said it was shutting down, a more widely known cloud vendor -- Google (Nasdaq: GOOG) -- had a brief outage of its Gmail service because of a data center problem. Undaunted, Google announced that same day that it will start charging for Google App Engine, its Web-based application platform (or platform as a service).

No one should expect cloud computing to be infallible; software and servers never are, no matter where they reside. But Coghead's closure lends sobriety to the excitement surrounding cloud computing, which has attracted entrepreneurs big and small and fueled a new wave of venture capital in recent years.

To read on, see the full story on InformationWeek.com

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Cartoon
Slideshows
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
Jeremy Schulman, founder of Schprockits, a network automation startup operating in stealth mode, joins us to explore whether networking professionals all need to learn programming in order to remain employed.
White Papers
Register for Network Computing Newsletters
Current Issue
Video
Twitter Feed