Author
 Curtis Franklin Jr.

Profile of Curtis Franklin Jr.

Member Since: 4/24/2014
Author
Blog Posts: 2
Posts: 32

Curtis Franklin Jr. has been writing about technologies and products in computing and networking since the early 1980s. He contributes to a number of technology-industry publications including Information Week , ChannelWeb , Network Computing , InfoWorld , PCWorld , Dark Reading , and ITWorld.com on subjects ranging from mobile enterprise computing to enterprise security and wireless networking. He is online community manager for the Interop conference and is a senior contributing analyst for the InfoWorld Test Center where he focuses on network infrastructure, wireless networking, and security.

Curt is the author of hundreds of articles, the co-author of three books, and has been a frequent speaker at computer and networking industry conferences across North America and Europe. His most popular book, The Absolute Beginner's Guide to Podcasting , with co-author George Colombo, was published by Que Books. His most recent book, Cloud Computing: Technologies and Strategies of the Ubiquitous Data Center , with co-author Brian Chee, was released in April 2010. When he's not writing, he is a painter, photographer, cook, and multi-instrumentalist musician; and is active in amateur radio (KG4GWA), scuba diving, and the Florida Master Naturalist program.

Articles by Curtis Franklin Jr.
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Jeremy Schulman, founder of Schprockits, a network automation startup operating in stealth mode, joins us to explore whether networking professionals all need to learn programming in order to remain employed.
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